Sunday, 26 November 2017

He Cometh


I don’t recall when I first began to think about death, my death, but I do know it wasn’t that long ago.  Until that time (whenever it was) although realising I was not immortal, I probably considered I was, for death was not a thing ever imagined, not an option, only life was. 

My death thoughts probably were given to me by protagonists of other stories, stories that weren’t mine, stories based on the fear of tomorrow, stories of worries that a tomorrow wasn’t possible.  These stories, these worries are now mine, an unwanted gift, unwrapped and laid bare, scarring my soul.

He slies in the night
salt and peppering my hair,
seasoning the fall. 

Anna :o]

Shared with the good folk at Poets United, hosted by the lovely Mary – cheers Mary!

Image:  Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Author:  Incry

19 comments:

X said...

Death is our last great friend, allowing us to stop running all over the place and just rest. It is interesting how our views of death are shaped by those around us, the movies we see, the stories you read.

It will come for all of us.
Age, Death. They are all just
a turn of the kaleidoscope away.

Mary said...

I think sometimes we cannot really appreciate life until we know that sometime there will be death. This past week I read an online article about Liam Neesen. His wife Natasha Richardson died in 2009 after a skiing accident. They had been so much in love. Neesen wrote recently that one really has to savor each moment with the one(s) loved as one doesn't really know when it will all come to a screeching halt....perhaps, like in his case, unexpectedly. I was thinking about the same subject, in a different kind of way, when I wrote my poem today. I do think it is the autumn feeling that makes one reflect even more than usual.

Sumana Roy said...

Nice thoughts. Death thought is not bad at all; it curbs ego. And sometimes death is merciful to those who need it badly.

Thotpurge said...

seasoning the fall... very clever turn of phrase Anna. I don't think death is a morbid topic, its certainty only heightens the sensation of living and urges us to live our short lives well.

Anonymous said...

you have seen the Damocles sword and it is like the elephant in the room now but now we can at least live the moment

brudberg said...

For some reason I think I feared death more as a child than I do today... but I think it may come back one day...

R.K. Garon said...

Yes, I understand (because it was so well presented). I'm at the point now of what I want done with my body.
: )
ZQ

indybev said...


Somehow, reading of your preoccupation with death and your salutation "Cheers, Mary!" left me smiling in the face of your somber words. An old Indian, Chief Seattle, said "There is no death, only a changing of worlds". I have said I'd like my epitaph to be "What's next?" Perhaps, just perhaps, Chief Seattle is right!

Sherry Marr said...

Ha, I wrote about death today myself.......I do not fear death, believing when one's soul has completed its purpose here, it moves on to other dimensions..........I resonated with your poem, and also your "Cheers, Mary" sounded so happy it made me smile.

Donna@LivingFromHappiness said...

Your poem also resonated with me. Coming to terms with our life and death are part of our path....and I fear death less and less....seeing my loved ones die was hard but now I accept the present moment more worrying less about that future time.

Wendy Bourke said...

This is brilliant. Loved it! Loved it! Loved it! The prose: so resonated with me. The haiku is stunning. I think about death, far more with each year that passes. Once those you have loved and lived life with start dying, I think that it is inevitable that you begin listening for Death's knock upon your door. In some ways - as painful as the deaths of loved ones are - they do have the effect of easing you into acceptance.

Truedessa said...

I started thinking of death a few years ago when I became very ill. I guess it was a wake up call and a reminder of my own mortality. I do, however, believe the soul lives on and enters a different sort of world. A very thought provoking poem.

annell said...

I have experienced death as a "surprise." And have come to the conclusion, it is to keep death close, so she won't sneak up on you. She won't come as a surprise.

Rommy said...

It is always sobering when we first contemplate our own death. But it can be also be an inspiration to do more with the time we have left.

Magaly Guerrero said...

Death is the Master Thief. We always know it's there, but it walks on such light feet... until it doesn't. Some times, I think life (and death) would be much less complicated, if we could see our deaths all our lives, if we could make friends with it, that way it wouldn't scare us so much when it shows up... it would be just going on a trip. The scary salt and pepper would be real seasoning, welcomed.

totomai said...

When I was in Japan, I tried to think more about death. They how open some of my Japanese friends and colleagues about it. Unlike in thr Philippines, it not really encouraged to talk about it. Death is inevitable but as Murakami said, Death is not the opposite of life, it is a part of life.

rallentanda said...

Mortality is something we must all face. I think one should prepare for death at around 55. Don't leave all the questions and thoughts for when you get the news your time is up. Reflection and mediatation is essential. Pope Francis recommends SILENCE. We are not silent enough.The answers are not forthcoming on the iphone.

Anonymous said...

Quoting Star Trek here is not intended to trivialize: I'm sure the scriptwriter here was indulging him or herself, perhaps paraphrasing a more "serious" thinker (I seem to think I've read something somewhere to that effect). I often think of this scene:

https://youtu.be/LoKY2FdC00Aing

Good to see you're still blogging! I haven't been really active for a long time.

Mama Zen said...

This is really well done. I don't know if I've ever Not thought about death.